When The Construction of Boston was conceived, the reverse of the usual creation process was applied. Rauschenberg, Tinguely, and Niki de Saint Phalle each envisioned and created their own works of art, separately from each other, and most importantly, separate from the playwright. After Kenneth Koch heard back from them about what they were planning on doing in the production and what their vision was, he wrote a play round their pieces of art, accumulating in the 1962 off-Broadway production of The Construction of Boston.

This isn't just your average, run-of-the-mill stage play. The three artists didn't just present their vision to Koch and went on with their lives; no, they created their concepts on stage, during the production itself. Making Boston far less a textual play, and pushing it into the realm of performance art.

Niki de Saint Phalle

Niki de Saint Phalle

However, this would be a sweeping generalisation and undervaluing of Koch's dialogues and monologues. As the audience sees Boston being "constructed" through art, Koch's humorous and often hard-hitting dialogue comments, criticises, satirises, and complements both urbanisation, city planning, the impossible demands of citizens, and the necessary added value of Art.